Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Edition
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Feed Feed

Antidepressants in Pregnancy Linked to Autism

Slightly Higher Risk Involved

MaxFXBillion Photos

A study by the University of Bristol, England, of 254,610 young people from Stockholm showed that children born to mothers taking antidepressants during pregnancy had more than a 4 percent risk of autism, compared to less than a 3 percent risk in children born to mothers with psychiatric conditions not on antidepressants. Depression is common in women of childbearing age, with 3 to 8 percent of pregnant European women prescribed antidepressants. But with 95 percent of them bearing children without autism, the risks and benefits must be carefully weighed, say researchers.


This article appears in the February 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Pillow Self-Talk

Spending a few minutes each night with three purposeful questions will help us to rest content and awaken with joy.

Eco-Upgrades for America’s Landmarks

From the Grand Canyon to the Gateway Arch to the Empire State Building, America’s landmarks are making the old new again with Earth-friendly changes.

Five Reasons to Love a Cat

Cats are low-maintenance, health-enhancing roommates; they’re also surprisingly eco-friendly.

Eye Contact Syncs Baby and Adult Brainwaves

When an adult looks into the eyes of a baby, a synchronization of brain waves occurs that supports early learning and communication skills, say Cambridge University researchers.

U.S. Midlife Women Choosing Natural Health Care

More than 80 percent of midlife women reported using complementary approaches in a recent survey, with herbal teas and vitamins the top choices.

Add your comment: