Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Edition

Calorie Restriction Slows Aging

Cutting Back Can Increase Longevity

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Thirty-seven healthy, non-obese adults between 21 and 50 years old put on a calorie restriction diet for two years showed reduced systemic oxidative stress, indicating greater protection against age-related neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as cancer and diabetes. Participants in this research, conducted by Pennington Biomedical Research, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, cut their calories by 15 percent and lost an average of 20 pounds without experiencing anemia, excessive bone loss or menstrual disorders. Their metabolism also slowed, indicating that they burned energy more efficiently, a factor that may be linked to longevity.


This article appears in the October 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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